Choices Blog

Immigration, Exclusion, and Race: It’s a Good Time to Teach About This

Andy Blackadar

We in the United States live in an era of superheated politics and a superheated news cycle where media attention flits from issue to issue, outrage to outrage. The president’s remarks on immigration from African countries and Haiti have put the spotlight squarely on him. The attitudes underlying his remarks deserve scrutiny. At the same […]

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We’re revamping our U.S. history series!

Jillian McGuire Turbitt

Choices is launching a new project that re-envisions our U.S. History Series. We will be adding new resources that provide additional breadth, depth, and rigor as well as new innovative lessons. We will be working with U.S. history scholars to write a number of new curriculum units that build on our current work. In the process, some of our titles […]

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The Kurdish Referendum

Andy Blackadar

On Monday, September 25, 2017, 92 percent of the Kurds in Iraq voted for independence in a vote that has been condemned by Iraq, Turkey, Iran, and Syria. Each of these countries, with their significant populations of Kurds, is reluctant to allow Kurds to establish an independent state.

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The Death of Liu Xiaobo

Andy Blackadar

Human right activist and Nobel Prize winner Liu Xiaobo died on July 13, 2017. I’ve reposted something I wrote in 2010 for the Watson Institute’s Global Conversation blog.

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Podcast: Histories that Inspire

Andy Blackadar

In this “Inside the Writers’ Room” podcast, Lindsay Turchan and I talk with James N. Green, the Carlos Manuel de Céspedes Professor of Latin American History at Brown University and the director of Brown’s Brazil Initiative.

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A Vote on Turkey’s Future

Susannah Bechtel

On April 16, Turkish citizens will go to the polls to vote on a package of constitutional amendments. The package proposes fundamental changes to Turkey’s parliamentary system of government—it would expand the powers of the presidency and dissolve the position of prime minister, among other changes. Public opinion is split on the referendum, and many […]

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Podcast: Role-playing Multiple Perspectives in the Classroom

Jillian McGuire Turbitt

Mackenzie Abernethy and Mimi Stephens of the Choices Program talk to Celeste Reynolds, a teacher at Mashpee High School in Massachusetts, about her experiences using Choices role plays as a way to get students thinking about multiple perspectives.

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Fake News? Teaching Media Literacy through Choices Curriculum

Ryan Sprott

More students are arriving to our classroom with uncertainties about what constitutes “fake” and “real” news. To address these questions, my co-teacher Laurie Smith and I used a recent Choices Teaching with the News lesson to strengthen students’ media evaluation skills. The following passages outline specific pedagogical strategies we implemented during this unit. Syrian Refugees […]

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Intersectionality in the Women’s March and the Classroom

Mackenzie Abernethy

Gender inequality often goes unaddressed in the classroom due in part to the complex, varied experiences of historical and current events through the lens of identity politics. This can be unfamiliar or intimidating territory for teachers. Fortunately, experienced researchers and educators have shared strategies and tools for discussing these issues with students. We hope that the resources […]

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Oral Histories: Students in the Civil Rights Movement

Andy Blackadar

On August 28, 1963, before a crowd of over 200,000 people in Washington D.C., Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered the most famous speech of the U.S. civil rights movement. “I have a dream,” he declared, “that one day even the state of Mississippi, a state sweltering with the heat of injustice, sweltering with the […]

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