How did early political debates shape the United States?

Out of Print.

In A More Perfect Union: The Constitutional Convention and the Ratification Debate, students revisit the events and controversies of 1787-88 to gain a deeper understanding of the political climate of the era and the values that contributed to the political foundation of the United States. Through exploring the parallels between the debates of 1788 and our country’s current political discourse, students gain an insight into many of the issues that define our own age.

 

VIDEOS
Whose interests did the U.S. Constitution reflect?
Were all early Americans familiar with the ideas of democracy and republican government?
What was the Thirteenth Amendment to the Constitution?
What is the basic principle of American democracy?
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Supplemental Resources

Additional reference material for added context and support.

BOOKS

Bowen, Catherine Drinker. Miracle at Philadelphia (Boston: Little, Brown and Company, 1986). 346 pages.

Farrand, Max. ed. The Records of the Federal Convention of 1787 (New York: Yale University Press, 1966). 1,900 pages.

Holton, Woody. Unruly Americans and the Origins of the Constitution. New York: Hill and Wang, 2007.

Kammen, Michael, ed. The Origins of the American Constitution: A Documentary History (New York: Penguin Books, 1986). 407 pages.

Maier, Pauline. Ratification: The People Debate the Constitution, 1787-1788. 1st Simon & Schuster hardcover ed. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2010.

Veit, Helen E. ed. Creating the Bill of Rights (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1991). 320 pages.

Wood, Gordon S. The Creation of the American Republic, 1776-1787 (New York: W.W. Norton and Company, 1969). 615 pages.

Wood, Gordon S. The Radicalism of the American Revolution (New York: Random House, 1993). 369 pages.

WEB LINKS
Primary Sources on the Constitution
A web site of The Constitution Center
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