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The curriculum A Forgotten History: The Slave Trade and Slavery in New England explores the effects of the trade in slaves and of slavery itself on the new Americans of the time. The unit helps students to understand how history, and the telling of history, affects us today.

Videos for Lessons: The videos below accompany lessons in the teacher's guide of the printed curriculum unit.

Videos for Readings follow the outline of the printed curriculum unit.

Scholars Online: Videos for Lessons

A Forgotten History: The Slave Trade and Slavery in New England

Scholars

James Campbell
James Campbell
Brown University

Kieth Stokes
Keith Stokes
Newport County Chamber of Commerce

Joanne Pope Melish
Joanne Pope Melish
University of Kentucky

Day One: Creating a Living Museum

These videos can be used to supplement the Day 1 lesson plan in A Forgotten History: The Slave Trade and Slavery in New England. The printed lesson directs students through a drama exercise in which they explore the nature of the triangle trade. These videos offer an excellent introduction to the activity, providing students with much of the background they need to develop their characters.

What was the triangle trade? [James Campbell - 1:16]

What countries were involved in the triangle trade? [James Campbell - 1:38]

How were New Englanders involved in the slave trade? [James Campbell - 1:50]

How was Newport, Rhode Island involved in the triangle trade? [Keith Stokes - 0:58]

How did the slave trade affect communities in Africa? [James Campbell - 1:06]

Why did Africans participate in the slave trade? [James Campbell - 1:40]

How did slave traders acquire captives? [James Campbell - 2:04]

How many Africans were transported across the Atlantic during the slave trade? [James Campbell - 1:38]

What was the journey from Africa to the Americas like for captives? [James Campbell - 2:40]

Day One Alternative: Slavery Connects the North and the South

This video can be used to supplement the Optional lesson plan in A Forgotten History: The Slave Trade and Slavery in New England. At the end of this mapping and document lesson in the printed text, students discuss how the telling of history has changed over time. Teachers might use this video as a starting point for that discussion.

How has the telling of this part of American history changed over time? [James Campbell - 2:06]

Day Two: Enslaved People’s Experiences

These videos can be used to supplement the Day 2 lesson plan in A Forgotten History: The Slave Trade and Slavery in New England. The printed lesson introduces students to several primary sources in order to help them understand the experiences of enslaved people in New England. Students work in groups to look at one source. These videos can help provide context for students, giving a broader picture and helping groups of students to make connections. Note that the first video discusses a runaway ad that is reproduced in the lesson. If students view this clip before investigating the ad themselves much of the work will already be done for them.

Interpreting an advertisement for runaway slaves. [Joanne Pope Melish - 4:00]

What was “family slavery”? [Joanne Pope Melish - 2:04]

How was slavery in New England different from slavery in the South? [Keith Stokes - 1:29]

What was unique about enslaved people's lives in New England? [Keith Stokes - 1:50]

How did religion influence early Africans in New England? [Keith Stokes - 1:54]

How do scholars get information about early Africans in Rhode Island? [Keith Stokes - 0:50]

How can historians use gravestones as primary sources? [Keith Stokes - 1:46]

Day Five: Making History

These videos can be used to supplement the Day 5 lesson plan in A Forgotten History: The Slave Trade and Slavery in New England. The printed lesson directs students to build a model for a museum exhibit on some aspect of this history. These videos can raise important questions for students to consider as they design their exhibits.

Why is it important to study this period of history? [Joanne Pope Melish - 1:51]

How has the telling of this part of American history changed over time? [James Campbell -2:06]

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