HOME     SCHEDULE     APPLY     IMPORTANT DATES     LOGISTICS     TEAM     CONTACT

 

This one-week Institute will take place July 10-14, 2023, at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island.
Schedule is subject to change.

Overall objectives
To promote a deeper understanding of U.S. wars through a three-part framework:

  1. What are the causes and origins of U.S. wars?
  2. What have been the first-hand experiences of U.S. military personnel during war?
  3. How have memories of war shaped U.S. culture and public discourse?

Expected outcomes
Drawing from talks, discussions, and materials from the Institute, participants will each develop an implementation plan on how to teach students about a U.S. war based on the Institute’s three-part framework model. Typically 4-5 pages in length, the plan is not a lesson plan. Instead, the plan is a statement of how to apply the framework in teaching U.S. wars that can be shared with your colleagues.

Readings
The readings will include, but not be limited to scholarship from the Institute’s academic facilitators. A bibliography of suggested readings for further exploration will also be provided.

  • Appy, Christian. Working-Class War: American Combat Soldiers and Vietnam. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1993. [selections]
  • Saville, Stephanie. “The Authorization for Use of Military Force: A Comprehensive Look at Where and How it Has Been Used.” Cost of War Project. Watson Institute of International and Public Affairs, Brown University. December 14, 2021. 
  • Shibusawa, Naoko. “U.S. Empire and Racial Capitalist Modernity.” Diplomatic History 45:5 (November 2021): 885-884.
  • Vuic, Kara Dixon, The Girls Next Door: Bringing the Home Front to the Front Lines. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2019. [selections]
  • Jimoh, A. Yemisi and Françoise Hamlin, eds. These Truly Are the Brave: An Anthology of African American Writings on War and Citizenship. Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 2015. [selections]

Schedule
I. Monday, July 10, 2023 – A Framework for Teaching about War: Origins and Causes, First Person Experiences, Historical Memory
Pavilion Room, Peter Green House, Department of History, Brown University

Key Thematic Questions
1. How should we teach the origins and causes of wars?
2. What is the civic importance of historical memory?

9:00 am: Welcome (Choices Faculty Director, Professor Rebecca Nedostup)
9:15 am: Greetings (Brown History Department Chair, Professor Ethan Pollock)
9:30 am: Ice-breaker – Getting to know you: Why are we here? What are our objectives?
10:15 am: Project Director Keynote and facilitated discussion – War in American History (Professor Naoko Shibusawa)
12:00 pm: Lunch on your own/with fellow participants
2:00 pm: Practicum – Using Archives and Special Collections in Your Teaching, The John Hay Library (Head of Special Collections Instruction Heather Cole)
5:00 pm: Explore Providence (optional)

II. Tuesday, July 11, 2023 – The “Good War”: Remembering World War II
Pavilion Room, Peter Green House, Department of History, Brown University

Key Thematic Questions
1. How did soldiers view the “Good War” as they served in it?
2. What motivated soldiers of different backgrounds to serve in the war?

8:30 am: Coffee/tea
9:00 am: Study hall (review reading, prep questions, discuss with fellow participants, consultation on implementation plans)
10:00 am: Project Faculty Presentation and facilitated discussion – World War II at Home and Abroad (Professor Kara Dixon Vuic)
11:45 am: Lunch on your own/with fellow participants
2:00 pm: Project Faculty Presentation and facilitated discussion – The Double-V Campaign Challenges Jim Crow: World War II (Professor Françoise N. Hamlin)
4:00 pm: Practicum – Teaching with First Person Sources on World War II from the Choices Program curriculum unit Japanese American Incarceration in World War II (Professor Naoko Shibusawa)
5:30 pm: Dinner on your own/with fellow participants

III. Wednesday, July 12, 2023 – The Vietnam War: Remembering it From All Sides
Pavilion Room, Peter Green House, Department of History, Brown University

Key Thematic Questions
1. Who served in the Vietnam War?
2. How did the war’s portrayal in popular culture affect historical memory of the war? 

8:30 am: Coffee/tea
9:00 am: Study hall (review reading, prep questions, discuss with fellow participants, consultation on implementation plans)
10:00 am: Faculty led discussion –  The Vietnam War at Home and Abroad (Professor Naoko Shibusawa)
11:45 am: Lunch on your own/with fellow participants
2:00 pm: Project Faculty Presentation and facilitated discussion – How First-Person Accounts Shape Historical Understanding (Professor Christian Appy)
4:00 pm: Practicum – Teaching Historical Memory in and out of the Classroom, Visit to Providence Memorial Park and Memorial Sites (Professor Rebecca Nedostup, Dr. Kevin Hoskins)
6:00 pm: Dinner on your own/with fellow participants
8:00 pm: Optional Practicum – Teaching Vietnam War Historical Memory through Film (Dr. Kevin Hoskins)

IV. Thursday, July 13, 2023 – The Long War: Iraq and Afghanistan
Pavilion Room, Peter Green House, Department of History, Brown University 

Key Questions
1. How has military service changed in the era of “long wars”?
2. How can we teach about recent conflicts in a politicized environment?

8:30 am: Coffee/tea
9:00 am: Study hall (review reading, prep questions, discuss with fellow participants, consultation on implementation plans)
10:00 am: Project Faculty Presentation and facilitated discussion – The Costs of War, Post-9/11 (Dr. Stephanie Savell)
11:45 am: Lunch on your own/with fellow participants
2:00 pm: Practicum – Perspectives in the Decision to Invade Iraq (Choices Program Director of Professional Development Mimi Stephens)
4:00 pm: Practicum – Creating Oral Histories: Personal Stories as Historical Sources
6:00 pm: Dinner on your own/with fellow participants

V. Friday, July 14, 2023 – Putting the Three-Part Framework into Action
Pavilion Room, Peter Green House, Department of History, Brown University

8:30 am: Coffee/tea
9:00 am: Recap of the framework, expectations for the day (Professor Naoko Shibusawa)
9:30 am: Workshop to draft implementation plans (Professor Naoko Shibusawa and Choices Program Curriculum and Professional Development Staff: Andrew Blackadar, Mimi Stephens, Susannah Bechtel, Dr. Kevin Hoskins)
11:45 am: Group lunch, sponsored by the Choices Program
2:00 pm: Presentations of Plans and Feedback (Professor Naoko Shibusawa and Choices Program Curriculum and Professional Development Staff: Andrew Blackadar, Mimi Stephens, Susannah Bechtel, Dr. Kevin Hoskins)
4:30 pm: Evaluation and Next Steps (Mimi Stephens)
5:00 pm: Institute ends

 

BACK TO TOP

Back to top